Happy Green Halloween! Hope it's just smurfy!

Sometimes we get so consumed by the excitement of holidays, we forget our green routine. Thankfully, Green Halloween reminds us all to avoid becoming environmental monsters this Halloween. Some things I'll be doing differently this Halloween are using soy or beeswax candles, composting my pumpkin waste and making my costume using second-hand clothing. For ideas on how to green your Halloween, check out this video. Then, stick around and I'll share with you how my friend and I are making our own Smurf costumes (no sewing machine required)!

 

 

This year our Green Halloween is blue: We're going to be Smurfs!

 

Can't remember their names? Check out the Smurf website for a trip down memory lane.

 

With the intention of becoming a Smurf and Smurfette, we shopped for materials to make our costumes yesterday and spent less than $25 a person. Being green saves you money! We saw Smurf costumes online for about $60 (for two costumes) and that doesn't include all accessories such as face paint and shoes that we bought for our homemade version. Another bonus is that our costumes will look so much nicer than the low-quality, store-bought version. (And I'll just be Smurfette, not slutty Smurfette. Why are all women's Halloween costumes so slutty in the stores?)

Here's what we found to make the costumes.

From the thrift store:

  • 2 white turtle necks (will be dyed blue)
  • 1 pair of white pants (for the Smurf costume, Smurfette wears a dress and fortunately my white night gown will work fine for that)
  • 1 pair of white bootie style slippers (for my friend, I already have a pair of white sneakers that will work).

 

From the store:

  • 1 yard of white felt (for making smurf hats and tails)
  • 1 package liquid stitch glue (to make the the hats since I can't sew)
  • white gloves and leggings (to be dyed blue; we couldn't find these at the thrift store)
  • 3 packages of blue dye (for dying the turtle necks, leggings and gloves)
  • blue face paint


This weekend, we'll dye the turtle necks, gloves, leggings and some of the felt (for making tails) blue. Next weekend, we'll make the Smurf hats and tails. I found a cute video on YouTube of a girl showing us how to make a smurf hat and will use her technique, except instead of paper and tape, we'll use felt and stitching glue (and then turn the hat inside out, so it looks like it was sewn with seams). I'll definitely post an update to the blog when we finish the costumes. 

Hopefully, this has inspired your own make-your-own costume idea. What will you or your kids be for Halloween? Are you making all or part of your costumes? If you're not dressing up, what other ways will you be green this Halloween? Please share your comments, and check back on the blog on Halloween Day to see how our Smurf costumes turned out.

 

Chel Rogerson